How to Visualize Urban Accessibility and Walkability

Tools like WalkScore visualize how “walkable” a neighborhood is in terms of access to different amenities like parks, schools, or restaurants. It’s easy to create accessibility visualizations like these ad hoc with Python and its pandana library. Pandana (pandas for network analysis – developed by Fletcher Foti during his dissertation research here at UC Berkeley) performs fast accessibility queries over a network. I’ll demonstrate how to use it to visualize urban walkability. My code is in these IPython notebooks in this urban data science course GitHub repo.

First I give pandana a bounding box around Berkeley/Oakland in the East Bay of the San Francisco Bay Area. Then I load the street network and amenities from OpenStreetMap. In this example I’ll look at accessibility to restaurants, bars, and schools. But, you can create any basket of amenities that you are interested in – basically visualizing a personalized “AnythingScore” instead of a generic WalkScore for everyone. Finally I calculate and plot the distance from each node in the network to the nearest amenity:

Berkeley Oakland California street network walking accessibility and walkability Continue reading How to Visualize Urban Accessibility and Walkability

Scientific Python for Raspberry Pi

Raspberry Pi 3 Model BA guide to setting up the Python scientific stack, well-suited for geospatial analysis, on a Raspberry Pi 3. The whole process takes just a few minutes.

The Raspberry Pi 3 was announced two weeks ago and presents a substantial step up in computational power over its predecessors. It can serve as a functional Wi-Fi connected Linux desktop computer, albeit underpowered. However it’s perfectly capable of running the Python scientific computing stack including Jupyter, pandas, matplotlib, scipy, scikit-learn, and OSMnx.

Despite (or because of?) its low power, it’s ideal for low-overhead and repetitive tasks that researchers and engineers often face, including geocoding, web scraping, scheduled API calls, or recurring statistical or spatial analyses (with small-ish data sets). It’s also a great way to set up a simple server or experiment with Linux. This guide is aimed at newcomers to the world of Raspberry Pi and Linux, but who have an interest in setting up a Python environment on these $35 credit card sized computers. We’ll run through everything you need to do to get started (if your Pi is already up and running, skip steps 1 and 2). Continue reading Scientific Python for Raspberry Pi

Urban Informatics and Visualization at UC Berkeley

The fall semester begins next week at UC Berkeley. For the third year in a row, Paul Waddell and I will be teaching CP255: Urban Informatics and Visualization, and this is my first year as co-lead instructor.

This masters-level course trains students to analyze urban data, develop indicators, conduct spatial analyses, create data visualizations, and build Paris open datainteractive web maps. To do this, we use the Python programming language, open source analysis and visualization tools, and public data.

This course is designed to provide future city planners with a toolkit of technical skills for quantitative problem solving. We don’t require any prior programming experience – we teach this from the ground up – but we do expect prior knowledge of basic statistics and GIS.

Update, September 2017: I am no longer a Berkeley GSI, but Paul’s class is ongoing. Check out his fantastic teaching materials in his GitHub repo. From my experiences here, I have developed a cycle of course materials, IPython notebooks, and tutorials towards an urban data science course based on Python, available in this GitHub repo.

Continue reading Urban Informatics and Visualization at UC Berkeley

Visualizing Summer Travels Part 6: Projecting Spatial Data with Python

This post is part of a series on visualizing data from my summer travels.

I’ve previously discussed visualizing the GPS location data from my summer travels with CartoDB, Leaflet, and Mapbox + Tilemill. I also visualized different aspects of this data set in Python, using the matplotlib plotting library. However, these spatial scatter plots used unprojected lat-long data which looked pretty distorted at European latitudes.

Today I will show how to convert this data into a projected coordinate reference system and plot it again using matplotlib. These projected maps will provide a much more accurate spatial representation of my spatial data and the geographic region. All of my code is available in this GitHub repo, particularly this notebook.

Continue reading Visualizing Summer Travels Part 6: Projecting Spatial Data with Python

Using geopandas on Windows

projected-shapefile-gps-coordinatesThis guide was updated in June 2016 to reflect changes to the dependencies and the ability to install with Python wheels.

I recently went through the exercise of installing geopandas on Windows and getting it to run. Having learned several valuable lessons, I thought I’d share them with the world in case anyone else is trying to get this toolkit working in a Windows environment (also see this GitHub gist I put together).

It seems that pip installing geopandas works fine on Linux and Mac. However, several of its dependencies have C extensions that cause compilation failures with pip on Windows. This guide gets around that issue. For preliminaries, I have this working on Windows 7, 8, and 10. My Python environments are Anaconda, 64-bit, with both Python 2.7 and 3.5. I’m running geopandas version 0.2 with GDAL 2.0.2, Fiona 1.7.0, pyproj 1.9.5.1, and shapely 1.5.16.

Continue reading Using geopandas on Windows

Visualizing Summer Travels Part 5: Python + Matplotlib

This post is part of a series on visualizing data from my summer travels.

I’ve previously discussed visualizing the GPS location data from my summer travels with CartoDB, Leaflet, and Mapbox + Tilemill. Today I will explore visualizing this data set in Python, using the matplotlib plotting library. All of my code is available in this GitHub repo, particularly this notebook.

Continue reading Visualizing Summer Travels Part 5: Python + Matplotlib