Mapping Everywhere I’ve Ever Been in My Life

I recently wrote about visualizing my Foursquare check-in history and mapping my Google location history, and it inspired me to mount a more substantial project: mapping everywhere I’ve ever been in my life (!!). I’ve got 4 years of Foursquare check-ins and Google location history data. For everything pre-smart phone, I typed up a simple spreadsheet of places I’d visited in the past and then geocoded it with the Google Maps API. All my Python and Leaflet code is available in this GitHub repo and is easy to re-purpose to visualize your own location history.

I’ll show the maps first, then run through the process I followed, below. First off, I used Python and matplotlib basemap to create this map of everywhere I’ve ever been:

Location History World Map, data from Foursquare and Google, made with Python matplotlib basemap

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The Landscape of U.S. Rents

Which U.S. cities are the most expensive for rental housing? Where are rents rising the fastest? The American Community Survey (ACS) recently released its latest batch of 1-year data and I analyzed, mapped, and visualized it. My methodology is below, and my code and data are in this GitHub repo.

This interactive map shows median rents across the U.S. for every metro/micropolitan area. Click any one for details on population, rent, and change over time. Click “switch” to re-draw the map to visualize how median rents have risen since 2010:

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Urban Informatics and Visualization at UC Berkeley

The fall semester begins next week at UC Berkeley. For the third year in a row, Paul Waddell and I will be teaching CP255: Urban Informatics and Visualization.

This masters-level course trains students to analyze urban data, develop indicators, conduct spatial analyses, create data visualizations, and build Paris open datainteractive web maps. To do this, we use the Python programming language, open source analysis and visualization tools, and public data.

This course is designed to provide future city planners with a toolkit of technical skills for quantitative problem solving. We don’t require any prior programming experience – we teach this from the ground up – but we do expect prior knowledge of basic statistics and GIS.

Our teaching materials, including IPython Notebooks, tutorials, and guides are available in this GitHub repo, updated as the semester progresses.

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Visualizing Summer Travels Part 4: Mapbox + Tilemill

This post is part of a series on visualizing data from my summer travels.

I’ve previously discussed my goals in visualizing GPS data from my summer travels and explored visualizing the data set with CartoDB and with Leaflet. The full OpenPaths location data from my summer travels is available here and I discussed how I reverse-geocoded it here.

Mapbox is a major provider of online web mapping services such as tiled web maps, the Tilemill cartography IDE, and the mapbox.js javascript library. Today I’ll run through how to create an interactive data map in Tilemill’s design studio, export the map as a set of tiles, upload the tileset to Mapbox, and then use a javascript client to display the map on a web page. Our final result will look something like this:

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Visualizing Summer Travels Part 3: Leaflet

This post is part of a series on visualizing data from my summer travels.

I’ve previously discussed my goals in visualizing GPS data from my summer travels and explored visualizing the data set with CartoDB. The full OpenPaths location data from my summer travels is available here and I discussed how I reverse-geocoded it here.

Lastly, I reduced the size of this spatial data set so Leaflet can render it more quickly on low-power mobile devices. I discussed why this is important and how to do it with the DBSCAN clustering algorithm and also with the Douglas-Peucker algorithm. The final data set I’ll be working with is available here.

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