Square-Mile Street Network Visualization

The heart of Allan Jacobs’ classic book on street-level urban form and design, Great Streets, features dozens of hand-drawn figure-ground diagrams in the style of Nolli maps. Each depicts one square mile of a city’s street network. Drawing these cities at the same scale provides a revealing spatial objectivity in visually comparing their street networks and urban forms.

We can recreate these visualizations automatically with Python and the OSMnx package, which I developed as part of my dissertation. With OSMnx we can download a street network from OpenStreetMap for anywhere in the world in just one line of code. Here are the square-mile diagrams of Portland, San Francisco, Irvine, and Rome created and plotted automatically by OSMnx:

OSMnx: Figure-ground diagrams of one square mile of Portland, San Francisco, Irvine, and Rome shows the street network, urban form, and urban design in these cities

Continue reading Square-Mile Street Network Visualization

OSMnx: Python for Street Networks

OSMnx: New York City urban street network visualized and analyzed with Python and OpenStreetMap dataOSMnx is a Python package for downloading administrative boundary shapes and street networks from OpenStreetMap. It allows you to easily construct, project, visualize, and analyze complex street networks in Python with NetworkX. You can get a city’s or neighborhood’s walking, driving, or biking network with a single line of Python code. Then you can simply visualize cul-de-sacs or one-way streets, plot shortest-path routes, or calculate stats like intersection density, average node connectivity, or betweenness centrality. You can download/cite the paper here.

In a single line of code, OSMnx lets you download, construct, and visualize the street network for, say, Modena Italy:

import osmnx as ox
ox.plot_graph(ox.graph_from_place('Modena, Italy'))

OSMnx: Modena Italy networkx street network in Python from OpenStreetMap Continue reading OSMnx: Python for Street Networks

Scientific Python for Raspberry Pi

Raspberry Pi 3 Model BA guide to setting up the Python scientific stack, well-suited for geospatial analysis, on a Raspberry Pi 3. The whole process takes just a few minutes.

The Raspberry Pi 3 was announced two weeks ago and presents a substantial step up in computational power over its predecessors. It can serve as a functional Wi-Fi connected Linux desktop computer, albeit underpowered. However it’s perfectly capable of running the Python scientific computing stack including Jupyter, pandas, matplotlib, scipy, scikit-learn, and OSMnx.

Despite (or because of?) its low power, it’s ideal for low-overhead and repetitive tasks that researchers and engineers often face, including geocoding, web scraping, scheduled API calls, or recurring statistical or spatial analyses (with small-ish data sets). It’s also a great way to set up a simple server or experiment with Linux. This guide is aimed at newcomers to the world of Raspberry Pi and Linux, but who have an interest in setting up a Python environment on these $35 credit card sized computers. We’ll run through everything you need to do to get started (if your Pi is already up and running, skip steps 1 and 2). Continue reading Scientific Python for Raspberry Pi

Urban Informatics and Visualization at UC Berkeley

The fall semester begins next week at UC Berkeley. For the third year in a row, Paul Waddell and I will be teaching CP255: Urban Informatics and Visualization.

This masters-level course trains students to analyze urban data, develop indicators, conduct spatial analyses, create data visualizations, and build Paris open datainteractive web maps. To do this, we use the Python programming language, open source analysis and visualization tools, and public data.

This course is designed to provide future city planners with a toolkit of technical skills for quantitative problem solving. We don’t require any prior programming experience – we teach this from the ground up – but we do expect prior knowledge of basic statistics and GIS.

Our teaching materials, including IPython Notebooks, tutorials, and guides are available in this GitHub repo, updated as the semester progresses.

Continue reading Urban Informatics and Visualization at UC Berkeley

Visualizing Summer Travels Part 6: Projecting Spatial Data with Python

This post is part of a series on visualizing data from my summer travels.

I’ve previously discussed visualizing the GPS location data from my summer travels with CartoDB, Leaflet, and Mapbox + Tilemill. I also visualized different aspects of this data set in Python, using the matplotlib plotting library. However, these spatial scatter plots used unprojected lat-long data which looked pretty distorted at European latitudes.

Today I will show how to convert this data into a projected coordinate reference system and plot it again using matplotlib. These projected maps will provide a much more accurate spatial representation of my spatial data and the geographic region. All of my code is available in this GitHub repo, particularly this notebook.

Continue reading Visualizing Summer Travels Part 6: Projecting Spatial Data with Python

Using geopandas on Windows

projected-shapefile-gps-coordinatesThis guide was updated in June 2016 to reflect changes to the dependencies and the ability to install with Python wheels.

I recently went through the exercise of installing geopandas on Windows and getting it to run. Having learned several valuable lessons, I thought I’d share them with the world in case anyone else is trying to get this toolkit working in a Windows environment (also see this GitHub gist I put together).

It seems that pip installing geopandas works fine on Linux and Mac. However, several of its dependencies have C extensions that cause compilation failures with pip on Windows. This guide gets around that issue. For preliminaries, I have this working on Windows 7, 8, and 10. My Python environments are Anaconda, 64-bit, with both Python 2.7 and 3.5. I’m running geopandas version 0.2 with GDAL 2.0.2, Fiona 1.7.0, pyproj 1.9.5.1, and shapely 1.5.16.

Continue reading Using geopandas on Windows

Visualizing Summer Travels Part 5: Python + Matplotlib

This post is part of a series on visualizing data from my summer travels.

I’ve previously discussed visualizing the GPS location data from my summer travels with CartoDB, Leaflet, and Mapbox + Tilemill. Today I will explore visualizing this data set in Python, using the matplotlib plotting library. All of my code is available in this GitHub repo, particularly this notebook.

Continue reading Visualizing Summer Travels Part 5: Python + Matplotlib

Clustering to Reduce Spatial Data Set Size

In this tutorial, I demonstrate how to reduce the size of a spatial data set of GPS latitude-longitude coordinates using Python and its scikit-learn implementation of the DBSCAN clustering algorithm. All my code is in this IPython notebook in this GitHub repo, where you can also find the data.

Traditionally it’s been a problem that researchers did not have enough spatial data to answer useful questions or build compelling visualizations. Today, however, the problem is often that we have too much data. Too many scattered points on a map can overwhelm a viewer looking for a simple narrative. Furthermore, rendering a JavaScript web map (like Leaflet) with millions of data points on a mobile device can swamp the processor and be unresponsive.

Continue reading Clustering to Reduce Spatial Data Set Size