OSMnx and Street Network Elevation Data

OSMnx can now download street network elevation data for anywhere in the world. In one line of code it downloads the elevation in meters of each network node, and in one more line of code it can calculate every street (ie, edge) grade. Here is the complete street network of San Francisco, California, with nodes colored according to their elevation:

OSMnx street network elevation data for San Francisco, California to calculate street grade and steepness

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Urban Form Analysis with OpenStreetMap Data

Figure-ground diagrams of urban form and building footprints in London, Paris, Venice, and Brasilia depict modernism's inversion of traditional spatial orderThis is a summary of some of my recent research on making OpenStreetMap data analysis easy for urban planners. It was also published on the ACSP blog.

OpenStreetMap – a collaborative worldwide mapping project inspired by Wikipedia – has emerged in recent years as a major player both for mapping and acquiring urban spatial data. Though coverage varies somewhat worldwide, its data are of high quality and compare favorably to CIA World Factbook estimates and US Census TIGER/Line data. OpenStreetMap imported the TIGER/Line roads in 2007 and since then its community has made numerous corrections and improvements. In fact, many of these additions go beyond TIGER/Line’s scope, including for example passageways between buildings, footpaths through parks, bike routes, and detailed feature attributes such as finer-grained street classifiers, speed limits, etc.

This presents a fantastic data source to help answer urban planning questions, but OpenStreetMap’s data has been somewhat difficult to work with due to its Byzantine query language and coarse-grained bulk extracts provided by third parties. As part of my dissertation, I developed a tool called OSMnx that allows researchers to download street networks and building footprints for any city name, address, or polygon in the world, then analyze and visualize them. OSMnx democratizes these data and methods to help technical and non-technical planners and researchers use OpenStreetMap data to study urban form, circulation networks, accessibility, and resilience.

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OSMnx: Python for Street Networks

OSMnx: New York City urban street network visualized and analyzed with Python and OpenStreetMap dataOSMnx is a Python package for downloading administrative boundary shapes and street networks from OpenStreetMap. It allows you to easily construct, project, visualize, and analyze complex street networks in Python with NetworkX. You can get a city’s or neighborhood’s walking, driving, or biking network with a single line of Python code. Then you can simply visualize cul-de-sacs or one-way streets, plot shortest-path routes, or calculate stats like intersection density, average node connectivity, or betweenness centrality. You can download/cite the paper here.

In a single line of code, OSMnx lets you download, construct, and visualize the street network for, say, Modena Italy:

import osmnx as ox
ox.plot_graph(ox.graph_from_place('Modena, Italy'))

OSMnx: Modena Italy networkx street network in Python from OpenStreetMap Continue reading OSMnx: Python for Street Networks

Mapping Everywhere I’ve Ever Been in My Life

I recently wrote about visualizing my Foursquare check-in history and mapping my Google location history, and it inspired me to mount a more substantial project: mapping everywhere I’ve ever been in my life (!!). I’ve got 4 years of Foursquare check-ins and Google location history data. For everything pre-smart phone, I typed up a simple spreadsheet of places I’d visited in the past and then geocoded it with the Google Maps API. All my Python and Leaflet code is available in this GitHub repo and is easy to re-purpose to visualize your own location history.

I’ll show the maps first, then run through the process I followed, below. First off, I used Python and matplotlib basemap to create this map of everywhere I’ve ever been:

Location History World Map, data from Foursquare and Google, made with Python matplotlib basemap

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Analyzing Last.fm Listening History

Last.fm is a web site that tracks your music listening history across devices (computer, phone, iPod, etc) and services (Spotify, iTunes, Google Play, etc). I’ve been using Last.fm for nearly 10 years now, and my tracked listening history goes back even further when you consider all my pre-existing iTunes play counts that I scrobbled (ie, submitted to my Last.fm database) when I joined Last.fm.

Using Python, pandas, matplotlib, and leaflet, I downloaded my listening history from Last.fm’s API, analyzed and visualized the data, downloaded full artist details from the Musicbrainz API, then geocoded and mapped all the artists I’ve played. All of my code used to do this is available in this GitHub repo, and is easy to re-purpose for exploring your own Last.fm history. All you need is an API key.

Last.fm artists played the most

First I visualized my most-played artists, above. Across the dataset, I have 279,769 scrobbles (aka, song plays). I’ve listened to 26,761 different artists and 66,377 different songs across 38,026 different albums from when I first started using iTunes circa 2005 through the present day. This includes pretty close to every song I’ve played on anything other than vinyl during that time. Continue reading Analyzing Last.fm Listening History

Scientific Python for Raspberry Pi

Raspberry Pi 3 Model BA guide to setting up the Python scientific stack, well-suited for geospatial analysis, on a Raspberry Pi 3. The whole process takes just a few minutes.

The Raspberry Pi 3 was announced two weeks ago and presents a substantial step up in computational power over its predecessors. It can serve as a functional Wi-Fi connected Linux desktop computer, albeit underpowered. However it’s perfectly capable of running the Python scientific computing stack including Jupyter, pandas, matplotlib, scipy, scikit-learn, and OSMnx.

Despite (or because of?) its low power, it’s ideal for low-overhead and repetitive tasks that researchers and engineers often face, including geocoding, web scraping, scheduled API calls, or recurring statistical or spatial analyses (with small-ish data sets). It’s also a great way to set up a simple server or experiment with Linux. This guide is aimed at newcomers to the world of Raspberry Pi and Linux, but who have an interest in setting up a Python environment on these $35 credit card sized computers. We’ll run through everything you need to do to get started (if your Pi is already up and running, skip steps 1 and 2). Continue reading Scientific Python for Raspberry Pi

Urban Informatics and Visualization at UC Berkeley

The fall semester begins next week at UC Berkeley. For the third year in a row, Paul Waddell and I will be teaching CP255: Urban Informatics and Visualization.

This masters-level course trains students to analyze urban data, develop indicators, conduct spatial analyses, create data visualizations, and build Paris open datainteractive web maps. To do this, we use the Python programming language, open source analysis and visualization tools, and public data.

This course is designed to provide future city planners with a toolkit of technical skills for quantitative problem solving. We don’t require any prior programming experience – we teach this from the ground up – but we do expect prior knowledge of basic statistics and GIS.

Our teaching materials, including IPython Notebooks, tutorials, and guides are available in this GitHub repo, updated as the semester progresses.

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Visualizing Summer Travels

projected-shapefile-gps-coordinatesThis is a series of posts about visualizing spatial data. I spent a couple of months traveling in Europe this summer and collected GPS location data throughout the trip with the OpenPaths app. I explored different web mapping technologies such as CartoDB, Leaflet, Mapbox, and Tilemill to plot my travels. I also used Python and matplotlib to run some descriptive statistics and visualize other aspects of my trip.

Here is the series of posts:

My Python code is available in this GitHub repo. I also did some more involved work under the hood to prep the data and support these visualizations. For example, in the following posts I reverse-geocoded the spatial data set and reduced its size with clustering algorithms and the Douglas-Peucker algorithm:

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Reverse Geocode a Set of Lat-Long Coordinates to City + Country

This tutorial demonstrates how to reverse geocode a set of latitude-longitude coordinates to city and country using Python and the Google Maps API.

I have previously written about my GPS location data from this summer’s travels. The data set, gathered with the OpenPaths app, contains lat-long coordinates and timestamps. Without city or country data, any visualizations would be very simplistic because all I have is coordinates and timestamps. It would be nice to reverse geocode these coordinates to add city and country data to each point. Then, I could create richer, more informative marker popups that include this new geographical information.

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